Ralet 759 liberty jumping in the show ring at Kellogg Ranch.

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 13: The 1930 Foal Crop

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The 1930 foal crop of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch at Pomona, California, consisted of 21 youngsters – the largest crop yet for the then five year old stud which had already gained wide recognition and fame. There were eleven fillies and ten colts which arrived from January through November with the six births during April making it the busiest month.

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Mariam 181

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 12: The New Arabians of 1930

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese, was not only an astute and well educated horseman, manager, businessman, and gifted horse breeder, but was also a born horse trader. In 1930 there were so few Arabians in the United States – less than 800 living animals – that, despite the depression, buyers were to be found for most of the few Arabs which were available for sale.

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Crabbet of Maynesboro Stud

The Maynesboro Stud: A Glimpse at the Past, to Preserve the Future…

By Gaye Schaufas-Myers. This tribute is about a man who had a vision for perpetuating and preserving some of the rarest bloodlines in today’s Arabian pedigrees…William Robinson Brown. Thanks to his foresight we are still able to enjoy the quality of these bloodlines in our Arabians of today, bloodlines that are still being preserved by a few select breeding programs.

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*Magic Domino, imported Crabbet Arabian stallion

Northwest CMK Symposium 1994: Stories and Photos

By Eugenie M. McGuire. With a bit of planning my husband and I arranged to attend the Northwest CMK Symposium on August 26-28, 1994 in Albany, Oregon. The following are my personal impressions as I write this two months after attending the event. While I may mention specific people and horses please don’t feel offended if I have left you or your animals out. There were so many friendly people and good horses that it would be impossible to list them all.

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*Nizzam, Crabbet Arabian stallion

The Crabbet Influence in Dutch Arabian Breeding – Part 2: In Between Years

By Monique Lankhaar. In 1948 Dr. Houtappel imported the stallions Nizzam (Rissam x Nezma) who needs no introduction to American Crabbet breeders, and the The Chief (Riffal x Astrella, a full brother to Oran). He also imported the mares Sulka (Naseem x Nurschida), Tehoura (Radi x Niseyra) and Ziada (Fayal x Raxina). Nizzam and The Chief were both registered as bay, the mares Tehoura and Sulka were chestnuts and Ziada was a grey. Dr. Houtappel did not object against Skowronek, most of the horses he imported carried Skowronek’s blood in one or more lines. They were all used on Dr. Houtappel’s Rodania Stud for breeding.

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Wentworth family crest

The Barony of Wentworth

By R.J. Cadranell. One of the most important family names connected to the breeding of Crabbet horses is that of Wentworth. The Wentworth Barony was a title Crabbet Stud co-founders Lady Anne Blunt and her younger brother inherited from their mother’s family. From Lady Anne Blunt the title passed to her daughter Judith. As Lady Wentworth, she became one of the world’s most famous breeders of Arabian horses.

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Rebecca Gillen and Rabbiana+/, LaGue photo.

Ben Rabba’s Legacy, and Me

By Susan Gillen, DVM. Although Rabbiana was my first and dearest horse, I went on to ride and show many more of Jewell’s Ben Rabba foals. Each one captured my heart for their willingness to please and beautiful attitudes. Inheriting Ben’s quality of movement, they all were successful performance horses, although they were completely amateur trained. Among my favorites were Viva La Ribba (Golden State Futurity Reserve Champion Western Pleasure Junior Horse), Bwana Sahib (Region III Top Five Western Pleasure Junior Horse and Top Ten Bonanza Horse), La Contezza (National Top Ten Western Pleasure AAOTR), Calipso Mon (Multi Champion Western Pleasure and Hunter Pleasure and now owned by my sister JoAnn Harlan), and Shezzaflame (Top Ten Western Pleasure ATR Futurity). I am convinced that amateurs can be successful in the show ring if they have horses that are not just beautiful movers, but horses with incredible minds.

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Ben Rabba, photo provided by Jewell Cantrell.

Cantrell Arabs and the ‘Ben Rabba Collection’

By Pamela Biery. Many years ago, between appointments and errands, I went by Cantrell Arabians hoping to see the latest foal crop. Standing by the fence with Jewell Cantrell chatting about this and that, I suddenly felt a chill. We were surveying some fifteen to twenty Ben Rabba daughters, granddaughters and old-line Crabbet mares. I looked again at the pasture dotted with exquisite mares and back to Jewell, shaking my head. I was astounded not only by the beauty of the scene, but by the potential impact of the ‘Ben Rabba Collection’ on Crabbet breeding.

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A Resume of the Influence of Crabbet on South African Horse Breeding

By Rosemary Archer. There were no horses in South Africa until the second half of the 17th century when some were brought in from Java. Two or three hundred years previously, Arab traders had taken horses to Java and it was the descendants of these which were the first to be imported into South Africa. During the two centuries following the arrival of these ‘Java’ horses, others came from Persia and then from South America, the latter being descended from Arabians and Barbs.

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Indian Magic: Wentworth Superhorse

By Arlene Magid. Lady Wentworth strove for decades to achieve what she considered to be the ultimate Arabian-a horse of type and extraordinary presence, with superb motion, and larger size to appeal to those for whom Arabians were a bit small. She bred her masterpiece in Indian Magic, foaled at Crabbet in 1944. He embodied the concept of the ‘Wentworth Superhorse’ and none who saw him could forget his dynamic qualities.

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