UK Summer 2000 Stud Tour

By Georgia Cheer. The Farms that I visited on the summer tour were: Imperial Arabian Stud (Wiltshire), Klinta Arabians (Ireland), Star Arabian Stud (Lincolnshire), Al Waha Arabians (Surrey), Blue Moon Arabians (Surrey), Milla Lauquen Stud (Norfolk), Highfield Stud (Wales), Coed-y-Foel Arabian Stud (Wales), and Templars Stud (Lancashire). Combe Farm (Devon, Aug. 5, 2001). I will present a sample preview of what I will see at each farm below.

Continue Reading

Carol Mulder’s Australian Stud Visits, November, 2000

By Carol W. Mulder © 2001Parts 3 – 5. Parts 1 and 2 are in the Crabbet Influence Magazine 2001 International Issue. *This article continues from the 2001 Crabbet Influence magazine where Carol Mulder covered the Australian Crabbet show in Part 1 and the Crabbet Convention Part 2. Below is Part 3 – her visits […]

Continue Reading

Carleton Cummings and his Skyline Trust Arabians

By Rick Synowski. Like many kids looking for their first Arabian horse in the 1950’s and early 1960’s — kids perhaps from less than affluent families and looking to make their dreams of owning an Arabian horse come true — I first heard of Carleton Cummings after reading about his Skyline Trust Arabians. An article by H.H. Reese stated that Cummings had “developed his Arabian horse breeding program with the purpose of assisting boys and girls who like horses to secure good specimens of the breed on a partnership basis.” Reese’s article described Cummings’ “lend lease” program whereby youngsters could lease a mare, breed her and then, after the birth of the foal, return either the mare or the foal. To an imaginative 11-year-old, this sounded like just the ticket. I wrote a letter to Cummings.

Continue Reading

Kellogg Bloodlines Return to Cal Poly

By Sharon Byford-Ruth. A recent study revealed that less than a handful of broodmares at Cal Poly University (Pomona), former home of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Ranch, had any Kellogg blood at all. “Since this was the place that started the Kellogg bloodlines, and the oldest breeding herd on the continent, those bloodlines belong at Cal Poly,” says Dr. Cal Kobluk, Director of the Arabian Horse Department at Cal Poly Pomona, California. Dr. John Schelle, Director of the Arabian Horse Department at Michigan State University agrees. “It’s extremely important that we go back and maintain some of these genetics.”

Continue Reading
Bill Munson (left) with Jimmie Dean at the 1983 Crabbet Symposium Denver, Colorado. Carolyn Hasbrook photo.

Bill Munson – An Interview by Jim Robbins

By Jim Robbins. Ask Bill Munson how he breeds horses at his Shalimar Ranch in Harrison, Nebraska, and the answer is one word: “Raffles.” The pedigrees on Bill’s horses read ‘*Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles.’ He has been line-breeding horses with *Raffles blood at Shalimar since 1942. As a breeder, veterinarian, and the longest recorded Big ‘R’ judge in history, he is eminently qualified to begin the Historic Breeders series in the Crabbet Influence.

Continue Reading
Al-Marah Arabian Horses logo

My Visit to Al-Marah Arabians in November of 2002

By Les Crowl. I have wanted to attend the Al-Marah (Arabic for ‘The Very Happy’) Winter Forum for the past few years but due to timing and/or circumstances, was never able to go, until this year. Besides, the registration fee was reasonable and I couldn’t beat the deal I got on the hotel room and airline tickets, flying through Dallas-Fort Worth airport, rather than non-stop to Tucson!

Continue Reading
(Left to Right) Rifnada 836, Danas 842, and Ferdas 841. This photograph was taken from the entrance to the Kellogg stables; the horses are shown standing in the parking lot.

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 15: The 1931 Foal Crop

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The Kellogg Ranch at Pomona, California, was six years old in 1931 and the foal crop of that year was the seventh to be foaled at the ranch; the first foal crop, of 1925, had been in-utero purchases. Eighteen registered foals arrived in 1931. While these animals were bred by W.K. Kellogg, they actually reflected the breeding ideas and policies of the Kellogg Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese. The quality of the foals was more than gratifying in most cases.

Continue Reading