Roh Beta Gulastra 10216

By Karen Paulo. The great Gulastra 521 died before his last batch of foals arrived in 1955. Left among his legacy was a chestnut colt foaled on June 7, out of Al-Marah Aasaba 5352, “one of our best Indraff 1575 daughters,” states breeder Bazy Tankersley in some old correspondence regarding the mare. The colt was originally named Al-Marah Anmar, which is Arabic for ‘patriarch.’ The name was later changed to Roh Beta Gulastra, after his purchase in the 1956 Al-Marah Auction by Dr. Roger Baker, who was “Jack Armstrong – The All American Boy” of radio fame.

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Carleton Cummings and his Skyline Trust Arabians

By Rick Synowski. Like many kids looking for their first Arabian horse in the 1950’s and early 1960’s — kids perhaps from less than affluent families and looking to make their dreams of owning an Arabian horse come true — I first heard of Carleton Cummings after reading about his Skyline Trust Arabians. An article by H.H. Reese stated that Cummings had “developed his Arabian horse breeding program with the purpose of assisting boys and girls who like horses to secure good specimens of the breed on a partnership basis.” Reese’s article described Cummings’ “lend lease” program whereby youngsters could lease a mare, breed her and then, after the birth of the foal, return either the mare or the foal. To an imaginative 11-year-old, this sounded like just the ticket. I wrote a letter to Cummings.

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Kellogg Bloodlines Return to Cal Poly

By Sharon Byford-Ruth. A recent study revealed that less than a handful of broodmares at Cal Poly University (Pomona), former home of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Ranch, had any Kellogg blood at all. “Since this was the place that started the Kellogg bloodlines, and the oldest breeding herd on the continent, those bloodlines belong at Cal Poly,” says Dr. Cal Kobluk, Director of the Arabian Horse Department at Cal Poly Pomona, California. Dr. John Schelle, Director of the Arabian Horse Department at Michigan State University agrees. “It’s extremely important that we go back and maintain some of these genetics.”

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