*Count Dorsaz

*Count Dorsaz

The story of *COUNT DORSAZ and his descendants is one ideally suited to the writing of an entire book, rather than just an article. It is a tale of international success, as his descendants appear in pedigrees all over the world. His influence on the breed in America is a combination of chance circumstances: the exchange of breeding stock between the Crabbet and Hanstead studs, the sudden demise of Miss Gladys Yule shortly after the death of Lady Wentworth, and the foresight of the American breeder Bazy Tankersley in acquiring the cream of Crabbet and Hanstead horses, only available due to the high death duties on the estates of Lady Wentworth and Miss Yule.

Continue Reading

Oran by Arlene Magid

By Arlene Magid. The worldwide influence of Oran cannot be overestimated. Champions and national winners trace to him in the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. He was noted for his strong back, size, outstanding presence, and for siring foals with extremely elegant forehands and excellent motion. For Crabbet breeders worldwide (as he did for Lady Wentworth), Oran represents an outcross line for Skowronek breeding.

Continue Reading

Three Great Crabbet Sires: *Serafix, *Silver Vanity and *Raffles

By Georgia Cheer. Have you ever wondered what is so special about the Crabbet Arabian? Could it be their wonderful dispositions, their tractable minds or tremendous athletic ability, their prepotence for passing these characteristics through several generations, or that they excel in everything they are put to? Well, you could say that about nearly all Arabians, but here in the United States, Crabbet Arabians were some of the earliest and largest imports to our country, going back to 1893 when the bay stallion *Bedr 239 (Azrek x Bozra) was imported by W.H. Forbes. Altogether, about 145 Crabbet Arabians were brought to the U.S. from the years 1893 to 1976. So, what was the origination of the Crabbet Arabian?

Continue Reading

Star Arabian Stud, Lincolnshire – UK Summer 2000 Stud Tour

By Georgia Cheer. Daphne and Keith Gilbert began their Star Arabian Stud in 1971 when they purchased two gray mares from Crabbet. Those mares were AURORA (Oran x Shadowlight), who was foaled in 1966, and SELINA (Hanif x Dancing Diamond) foaled in 1968. Sadly, SELINA had died in 1999, AURORA the year before and their stallion INDIAN REFLECTION had passed away just a few months before my arrival in the summer of 2000. It seems my stud visit was far overdue and regrettably I had missed seeing these lovely Crabbet treasures.

Continue Reading

Roh Beta Gulastra 10216

By Karen Paulo. The great Gulastra 521 died before his last batch of foals arrived in 1955. Left among his legacy was a chestnut colt foaled on June 7, out of Al-Marah Aasaba 5352, “one of our best Indraff 1575 daughters,” states breeder Bazy Tankersley in some old correspondence regarding the mare. The colt was originally named Al-Marah Anmar, which is Arabic for ‘patriarch.’ The name was later changed to Roh Beta Gulastra, after his purchase in the 1956 Al-Marah Auction by Dr. Roger Baker, who was “Jack Armstrong – The All American Boy” of radio fame.

Continue Reading
Bill Munson (left) with Jimmie Dean at the 1983 Crabbet Symposium Denver, Colorado. Carolyn Hasbrook photo.

Bill Munson – An Interview by Jim Robbins

By Jim Robbins. Ask Bill Munson how he breeds horses at his Shalimar Ranch in Harrison, Nebraska, and the answer is one word: “Raffles.” The pedigrees on Bill’s horses read ‘*Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles.’ He has been line-breeding horses with *Raffles blood at Shalimar since 1942. As a breeder, veterinarian, and the longest recorded Big ‘R’ judge in history, he is eminently qualified to begin the Historic Breeders series in the Crabbet Influence.

Continue Reading
Al-Marah Arabian Horses logo

My Visit to Al-Marah Arabians in November of 2002

By Les Crowl. I have wanted to attend the Al-Marah (Arabic for ‘The Very Happy’) Winter Forum for the past few years but due to timing and/or circumstances, was never able to go, until this year. Besides, the registration fee was reasonable and I couldn’t beat the deal I got on the hotel room and airline tickets, flying through Dallas-Fort Worth airport, rather than non-stop to Tucson!

Continue Reading
Mariam 181

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 12: The New Arabians of 1930

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese, was not only an astute and well educated horseman, manager, businessman, and gifted horse breeder, but was also a born horse trader. In 1930 there were so few Arabians in the United States – less than 800 living animals – that, despite the depression, buyers were to be found for most of the few Arabs which were available for sale.

Continue Reading
*Nizzam, Crabbet Arabian stallion

The Crabbet Influence in Dutch Arabian Breeding – Part 2: In Between Years

By Monique Lankhaar. In 1948 Dr. Houtappel imported the stallions Nizzam (Rissam x Nezma) who needs no introduction to American Crabbet breeders, and the The Chief (Riffal x Astrella, a full brother to Oran). He also imported the mares Sulka (Naseem x Nurschida), Tehoura (Radi x Niseyra) and Ziada (Fayal x Raxina). Nizzam and The Chief were both registered as bay, the mares Tehoura and Sulka were chestnuts and Ziada was a grey. Dr. Houtappel did not object against Skowronek, most of the horses he imported carried Skowronek’s blood in one or more lines. They were all used on Dr. Houtappel’s Rodania Stud for breeding.

Continue Reading