Ralet 759 liberty jumping in the show ring at Kellogg Ranch.

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 13: The 1930 Foal Crop

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The 1930 foal crop of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch at Pomona, California, consisted of 21 youngsters – the largest crop yet for the then five year old stud which had already gained wide recognition and fame. There were eleven fillies and ten colts which arrived from January through November with the six births during April making it the busiest month.

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Mariam 181

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 12: The New Arabians of 1930

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese, was not only an astute and well educated horseman, manager, businessman, and gifted horse breeder, but was also a born horse trader. In 1930 there were so few Arabians in the United States – less than 800 living animals – that, despite the depression, buyers were to be found for most of the few Arabs which were available for sale.

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*Magic Domino, imported Crabbet Arabian stallion

Northwest CMK Symposium 1994: Stories and Photos

By Eugenie M. McGuire. With a bit of planning my husband and I arranged to attend the Northwest CMK Symposium on August 26-28, 1994 in Albany, Oregon. The following are my personal impressions as I write this two months after attending the event. While I may mention specific people and horses please don’t feel offended if I have left you or your animals out. There were so many friendly people and good horses that it would be impossible to list them all.

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Rebecca Gillen and Rabbiana+/, LaGue photo.

Ben Rabba’s Legacy, and Me

By Susan Gillen, DVM. Although Rabbiana was my first and dearest horse, I went on to ride and show many more of Jewell’s Ben Rabba foals. Each one captured my heart for their willingness to please and beautiful attitudes. Inheriting Ben’s quality of movement, they all were successful performance horses, although they were completely amateur trained. Among my favorites were Viva La Ribba (Golden State Futurity Reserve Champion Western Pleasure Junior Horse), Bwana Sahib (Region III Top Five Western Pleasure Junior Horse and Top Ten Bonanza Horse), La Contezza (National Top Ten Western Pleasure AAOTR), Calipso Mon (Multi Champion Western Pleasure and Hunter Pleasure and now owned by my sister JoAnn Harlan), and Shezzaflame (Top Ten Western Pleasure ATR Futurity). I am convinced that amateurs can be successful in the show ring if they have horses that are not just beautiful movers, but horses with incredible minds.

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Ben Rabba, photo provided by Jewell Cantrell.

Cantrell Arabs and the ‘Ben Rabba Collection’

By Pamela Biery. Many years ago, between appointments and errands, I went by Cantrell Arabians hoping to see the latest foal crop. Standing by the fence with Jewell Cantrell chatting about this and that, I suddenly felt a chill. We were surveying some fifteen to twenty Ben Rabba daughters, granddaughters and old-line Crabbet mares. I looked again at the pasture dotted with exquisite mares and back to Jewell, shaking my head. I was astounded not only by the beauty of the scene, but by the potential impact of the ‘Ben Rabba Collection’ on Crabbet breeding.

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Warren Park Stud: Years with Aulrab and GA Topaz

By Carol Mingst. More than twenty years ago, Sandy Warren was interested in breeding athletic, English style horses. Her young ranch, Warren Park Stud, already had seen some good animals, but she knew what she wanted. There was a mare named Alarieha (by Galahas) who was exactly what Sandy wanted to cross with Grace Baker’s stallion Aurab.

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Overlook Farwa (Abu Farwa x Al Marah Zaibaq) – The Next Chapter

By Kim Johnson. Overlook Farwa first came to my attention at the 1982 Reno Arabian Horse Fair, where owner Earl Guyton was putting on a cutting horse clinic. At that time, I was impressed by Farwa’s cutting agility and pedigree fame, but contented myself with admiring him on stallion row, as my own breeding goals were still in the designing and organizing stages.

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Towards an Appreciation of CMK Identity

By Michael Bowling *from the 1996 Preservation Breeding Symposium booklet. CMK stands for “Crabbet-Maynesboro-Kellogg” and recognizes three programs which transmitted much of the central stock of what became North America’s historical Arab-breeding tradition. The CMK Record newsletter grew out of the general interest in these horses in 1981, without attempting to define specific pedigree limits […]

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