The Silver Drift Influence in Australia

By Joan Flynn. After Lady Wentworth’s death in 1957, when the stud was being partly dispersed, Mrs. Mary Leitch of Sydney saw the young colt, SPINDRIFT, in a paddock there, fell in love with him, and bought him. Having retired from Arabian breeding and disposing of her entire stud to the Queensland Agricultural College, SPINDRIFT joined the New South Wales Department of Agriculture College for several seasons and in 1963 he went to the Queensland Agricultural College where he remained until his death of an apparent heart attack in 1978.

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Alla Amarward 1140 and H.H. Reese

By Carol W. Mulder © 1986. In some circles, at various times, Alla Amarward has been considered a controversial horse who was owned by a controversial man, H.H. Reese. However, in his prime at the peak of his immense popularity there was nothing controversial about Alla Amarward, although his owner was controversial even then. Yet this man owned the three leading American Arabian sires of their time, and Alla Amarward was one of the three (the other two were Ferseyn 1381 and Abu Farwa 1960).

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Fadjur: The Story of a Breed Legend

By Arlene Magid. Anyone who was fortunate enough to see Fadjur in person never forgot him. He epitomized the Arabian breed both in appearance and temperament. His huge dark eyes, tiny muzzle, wedge-shaped head with large nostrils, extremely arched neck, and high-flung tail (no ginger needed!) drew admirers to him. More importantly, Fadjur was a good horse as well as a fine example of the breed, with great strength of loin and correct legs (two traits that can be lacking in today’s halter horses).

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*Serafix: Premier Crabbet Broodmare Sire

By Arlene Magid. The story of *Serafix’s importation and subsequent success as a sire has often been told before. He sired 119 champions (43 of them National winners) from his 257 registered foals, a champion percentage of 46%. Now, thirteen years after *Serafix’s death in 1973, it is time to examine the success of his grandget in the show ring and the breeding barn.

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Oran by Arlene Magid

By Arlene Magid. The worldwide influence of Oran cannot be overestimated. Champions and national winners trace to him in the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. He was noted for his strong back, size, outstanding presence, and for siring foals with extremely elegant forehands and excellent motion. For Crabbet breeders worldwide (as he did for Lady Wentworth), Oran represents an outcross line for Skowronek breeding.

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The Original Crabbet – Maynesboro – Kellogg Mare Families

By Rick Synowski. While CMK Arabian horses have come to represent a minority breeding group today, CMK foundation mare lines hold fast to their international domination of lists of leading dams of champions. Their production records, some accomplished by mares now deceased, may never be equaled. The character, type and breeding of such celebrated mares must inevitably be diminished and disappear when out crossing to stallions of other breeding groups predominates.

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Three Great Crabbet Sires: *Serafix, *Silver Vanity and *Raffles

By Georgia Cheer. Have you ever wondered what is so special about the Crabbet Arabian? Could it be their wonderful dispositions, their tractable minds or tremendous athletic ability, their prepotence for passing these characteristics through several generations, or that they excel in everything they are put to? Well, you could say that about nearly all Arabians, but here in the United States, Crabbet Arabians were some of the earliest and largest imports to our country, going back to 1893 when the bay stallion *Bedr 239 (Azrek x Bozra) was imported by W.H. Forbes. Altogether, about 145 Crabbet Arabians were brought to the U.S. from the years 1893 to 1976. So, what was the origination of the Crabbet Arabian?

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Templars Stud, Lancashire – UK Summer 2000 Stud Tour

By Georgia Cheer. Regrettably, I was unable to view Rachelle Newnham and Keith Barnes horses at Templars Stud as a foal had been ill and it was feared that I might possibly tread a germ onto another farm so it was decided for me not to visit. However, Rachelle had sent me this list of horses as of last summer 2000 and pedigrees which I have posted on the site.

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