Alla Amarward 1140 and H.H. Reese

By Carol W. Mulder © 1986. In some circles, at various times, Alla Amarward has been considered a controversial horse who was owned by a controversial man, H.H. Reese. However, in his prime at the peak of his immense popularity there was nothing controversial about Alla Amarward, although his owner was controversial even then. Yet this man owned the three leading American Arabian sires of their time, and Alla Amarward was one of the three (the other two were Ferseyn 1381 and Abu Farwa 1960).

Continue Reading

Fadjur: The Story of a Breed Legend

By Arlene Magid. Anyone who was fortunate enough to see Fadjur in person never forgot him. He epitomized the Arabian breed both in appearance and temperament. His huge dark eyes, tiny muzzle, wedge-shaped head with large nostrils, extremely arched neck, and high-flung tail (no ginger needed!) drew admirers to him. More importantly, Fadjur was a good horse as well as a fine example of the breed, with great strength of loin and correct legs (two traits that can be lacking in today’s halter horses).

Continue Reading

*Serafix: Premier Crabbet Broodmare Sire

By Arlene Magid. The story of *Serafix’s importation and subsequent success as a sire has often been told before. He sired 119 champions (43 of them National winners) from his 257 registered foals, a champion percentage of 46%. Now, thirteen years after *Serafix’s death in 1973, it is time to examine the success of his grandget in the show ring and the breeding barn.

Continue Reading

Oran by Arlene Magid

By Arlene Magid. The worldwide influence of Oran cannot be overestimated. Champions and national winners trace to him in the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. He was noted for his strong back, size, outstanding presence, and for siring foals with extremely elegant forehands and excellent motion. For Crabbet breeders worldwide (as he did for Lady Wentworth), Oran represents an outcross line for Skowronek breeding.

Continue Reading

Antezeyn Skowronek 5321

By Rick Synowski. Antezeyn Skowronek was the third ranking son of Abu Farwa for the number of foals sired (just over 100) and the number of Class A halter champions sired. However, he heads up the list of Abu Farwa sons whose sons have sired Class A halter champions. Quite a number of progeny of Antezeyn Skowronek matured to become the truly deluxe showhorses of the 50s and 60s in the Pacific Northwest. These were real beauties, tauted for their versatility, whose heyday has perhaps come and gone since the advent of the specialized horses which come to a show to be exhibited in one event or class category.

Continue Reading

Antez 448: The Versatile Arabian

By ‘The Horse Lover’ magazine (author unknown). A brief history of the progenitor of the Antez (Harara x Moliah) line; his sons and daughters are carrying on their great sire’s reputation in the show ring, and on the track. Antez (1921 chestnut stallion) was foaled in California from stock tracing entirely to the horses brought from the Arabian desert by Homer Davenport in 1906. His sire Harara and his dam Moliah had been bred at the Hingham Stock Farm in Massachusetts by Mr. Peter B. Bradley.

Continue Reading
(Left to Right) Rifnada 836, Danas 842, and Ferdas 841. This photograph was taken from the entrance to the Kellogg stables; the horses are shown standing in the parking lot.

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 15: The 1931 Foal Crop

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The Kellogg Ranch at Pomona, California, was six years old in 1931 and the foal crop of that year was the seventh to be foaled at the ranch; the first foal crop, of 1925, had been in-utero purchases. Eighteen registered foals arrived in 1931. While these animals were bred by W.K. Kellogg, they actually reflected the breeding ideas and policies of the Kellogg Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese. The quality of the foals was more than gratifying in most cases.

Continue Reading
Mariam 181

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 12: The New Arabians of 1930

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch manager, Herbert H. Reese, was not only an astute and well educated horseman, manager, businessman, and gifted horse breeder, but was also a born horse trader. In 1930 there were so few Arabians in the United States – less than 800 living animals – that, despite the depression, buyers were to be found for most of the few Arabs which were available for sale.

Continue Reading

The Horses of the World

By Lady Wentworth. The horse stock of the world can be roughly divided geographically into (A) “cold” blood (Equs caballus frigidus), which belongs to the North or more exactly Northwestern cold countries, including the strong slow-moving convex headed thick-skinned breeds, and (B) the “hot” blood of the South and East founded on the concave-headed Equus Arabicus, which is the tap root of speed and quality.

Continue Reading