Pilgrimage to Crabbet Park – 2002 Crabbet Convention

By Tiffani McCarthy. Like a modern-day Canterbury Tales, the devoted pilgrims flowed to Crabbet Park in Sussex for the opening of the Crabbet Convention. The only problem was that Crabbet Park is now less Canterbury Cathedral and more Bodiam Castle, just a shell of its former glory and purpose. This did not deter the delegates, however. This was the ancestral home of their beloved horses. For a few moments all of the memories from countless books and film clips and for a lucky few actual time spent at the stud came together through the magic grout of the imagination.

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Bill Munson (left) with Jimmie Dean at the 1983 Crabbet Symposium Denver, Colorado. Carolyn Hasbrook photo.

Bill Munson – An Interview by Jim Robbins

By Jim Robbins. Ask Bill Munson how he breeds horses at his Shalimar Ranch in Harrison, Nebraska, and the answer is one word: “Raffles.” The pedigrees on Bill’s horses read ‘*Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles on *Raffles.’ He has been line-breeding horses with *Raffles blood at Shalimar since 1942. As a breeder, veterinarian, and the longest recorded Big ‘R’ judge in history, he is eminently qualified to begin the Historic Breeders series in the Crabbet Influence.

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Malouma 738 w colt foal Bariz 3290

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 14: 1931, *Malouma 738 and *King John 739 Are Purchased

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. *Malouma 738 and *King John 739 had been brought to the Kellogg Ranch to be boarded in September of 1930 by their owner, Herman W. Frank of Los Angeles, California. In March of 1931 W. K. Kellogg bought the pair of Egyptian imports. They were the only Egyptian Arabians ever used in the old Kellogg breeding program.

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Ralet 759 liberty jumping in the show ring at Kellogg Ranch.

The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch – Part 13: The 1930 Foal Crop

By Carol Woodbridge Mulder. The 1930 foal crop of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch at Pomona, California, consisted of 21 youngsters – the largest crop yet for the then five year old stud which had already gained wide recognition and fame. There were eleven fillies and ten colts which arrived from January through November with the six births during April making it the busiest month.

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Wentworth family crest

The Barony of Wentworth

By R.J. Cadranell. One of the most important family names connected to the breeding of Crabbet horses is that of Wentworth. The Wentworth Barony was a title Crabbet Stud co-founders Lady Anne Blunt and her younger brother inherited from their mother’s family. From Lady Anne Blunt the title passed to her daughter Judith. As Lady Wentworth, she became one of the world’s most famous breeders of Arabian horses.

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Pete McNeil – A Lifetime With Arabians

By Arlene Magid. In the twenty first century there are just a handful of breeders of Arabian horses who have been active for fifty years or more. Some, like Varian Arabians and Al-Marah Arabians, advertise in the breed publications and have websites showcasing their horses, which are also shown extensively in local and national competition. But there are a few breeders with a lifetime of experience who don’t promote themselves, modestly preferring to produce horses true to their own particular vision.

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The Horses of the World

By Lady Wentworth. The horse stock of the world can be roughly divided geographically into (A) “cold” blood (Equs caballus frigidus), which belongs to the North or more exactly Northwestern cold countries, including the strong slow-moving convex headed thick-skinned breeds, and (B) the “hot” blood of the South and East founded on the concave-headed Equus Arabicus, which is the tap root of speed and quality.

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